Dads, Be Brave!

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Want your kids to be friendly and fear free at the dentist? It is up to you, Dads!  A new study reveals that parent’s attitude towards oral health and dental visits predict how their children will react in the same situations.  It is a good thing Dr. Doug Heller is a periodontist, his two kids will have some bright oral health futures.

The University of Madrid conducted a study comparing the views of children versus their parents when it comes to visiting dental offices like Periodontal Associates. Participants included 183 children between the ages of 7 and 12.  Forty-three experimental studies from across six continents were also included in this review.

The majority of studies confirmed a relationship between parental and child dental fear. This relationship is most evident in children aged 8 and under.  The study then concluded that, yes, there is an association between parental and child dental fear.  This is good to know as many people have anxiety and negative thoughts about dental work, and if we know where it begins, then Drs. Versman, Heller, and Beckman and others can put a stop to the fear.

América Lara Sacido, one of the authors of the study, said that “along with the presence of emotional transmission of dentist fear amongst family members, we have identified the relevant role that fathers play in transmission of this phobia in comparison to the mother.”

More so than mothers, fathers sway their children in how to react to the dentist.  In fact, the reaction from their dad will often over shadow the mother’s regardless if it is negative or positive.

 “Although the results should be interpreted with due caution, children seem to mainly pay attention to the emotional reactions of the fathers when deciding if situations at the dentist are potentially stressful,” said Lara Sacido.

1c170-dadTo help this cycle, Drs. Versman, Heller, and Beckman strongly suggest finding a steady, primary dental provider that the entire family can bond with and trust like Periodontal Associates.  Then, both parents should be active in the children’s dental appointments to assure they will be in good hands. Anxiety is a strong consequence of trips to the dentist office; however, as the industry advances routine dental procedures are becoming more and more comfortable.

 “Through the positive emotional contagion route in the family, the right attitude can be achieved in the child so that attending the dentist is not a problem.”

Need a dentist to trust? Call Periodontal Associates today as Dr. Versman, Dr.Heller, and Dr. Beckman are the best doctors in Denver! We provide dental implantsgum grafts, bone grafts, treat gum disease, and even provide regular hygiene cleaning appointments. Our patients travel from all over Denver, CO to see our specialists here in Aurora,CO, and some of our patients have even been with us for over 35 years!  We can be reached by call (303) 755-4500 or by clicking this link.  Visit our website for more information about common dental practices and more about Periodontal Associates.

Parents are linked to the number of cavities in their kids’ teeth

Mom’s Emotions Affect Kid’s Dental Health

Periodontal Associates wants everyone to know that gum disease and poor dental health can occur for many reasons.  Dr. Versman, Heller & Beckman suggest you talk to them about your home dental care to make sure you are doing everything you can to prevent gingivitis, cavities, and the need for dental implants.  With that being said, let’s take some time to discuss a new research determining factors in the number of cavities in children.

Researchers at the Case Western Reserve University, US recently released a study that links a mother’s emotional stability and educational background during her kid’s younger years to her child’s dental health at age 14.  The case was structure by interviewing candidates at the ages of three, eight, and finally 14 years old to determine what elements shaped their current oral health and number of cavities.

Suchitra Nelson, lead investigator on the study, had a team examine the teeth of the 224 adolescent participants in a longitudinal study that also followed very low birth weight vs. normal birth weight children. Factors like the number of decayed, filled, or missing permanent teeth and the level of dental plaque were used to determine the quality of oral health.  Case Western Dental School states that these are all direct symptoms of poor hygiene maintenance and Drs. Versman, Heller, and Beckman agree.

Even the mothers, or care givers, were interviewed to reveal their knowledge about preventative treatments like sealants, mouthwash, sugar drinks, access to dental care, and the frequency of visitations to a dentist.  The data revealed that even with access to dental insurance, fluoride treatments, and sealants as young children, it did not always prevent cavities by the age of 14, said Nelson.

Researchers were then able to conclude that the mothers and their overall emotional health, education level, and knowledge when children were at ages 3 and 8 were responsible for increased numbers of cavities when their children reached the age of 14.

Nelson stated, “We can’t ignore the environments of these children.  It isn’t enough to tell children to brush and floss; they need more — and particularly from their caregivers.”

The researchers also found that mothers with more education beyond high school, with healthy emotional states, and knowledge about eating right had children with healthier teeth.

If you are concerned about your knowledge and how to protect your family, continue to follow our blogs or schedule an appointment at Periodontal Associates to meet with one of our doctors: Dr. Versman, Dr. Heller, or Dr.Beckman.  You can schedule by calling us at (303) 755-4500, visiting our website at www.periodontalhealth.com, or clicking here.  Our patients come from all over Colorado but we primarily serve the Denver metro area as we are located in Aurora, CO.