Parents are linked to the number of cavities in their kids’ teeth

Mom’s Emotions Affect Kid’s Dental Health

Periodontal Associates wants everyone to know that gum disease and poor dental health can occur for many reasons.  Dr. Versman, Heller & Beckman suggest you talk to them about your home dental care to make sure you are doing everything you can to prevent gingivitis, cavities, and the need for dental implants.  With that being said, let’s take some time to discuss a new research determining factors in the number of cavities in children.

Researchers at the Case Western Reserve University, US recently released a study that links a mother’s emotional stability and educational background during her kid’s younger years to her child’s dental health at age 14.  The case was structure by interviewing candidates at the ages of three, eight, and finally 14 years old to determine what elements shaped their current oral health and number of cavities.

Suchitra Nelson, lead investigator on the study, had a team examine the teeth of the 224 adolescent participants in a longitudinal study that also followed very low birth weight vs. normal birth weight children. Factors like the number of decayed, filled, or missing permanent teeth and the level of dental plaque were used to determine the quality of oral health.  Case Western Dental School states that these are all direct symptoms of poor hygiene maintenance and Drs. Versman, Heller, and Beckman agree.

Even the mothers, or care givers, were interviewed to reveal their knowledge about preventative treatments like sealants, mouthwash, sugar drinks, access to dental care, and the frequency of visitations to a dentist.  The data revealed that even with access to dental insurance, fluoride treatments, and sealants as young children, it did not always prevent cavities by the age of 14, said Nelson.

Researchers were then able to conclude that the mothers and their overall emotional health, education level, and knowledge when children were at ages 3 and 8 were responsible for increased numbers of cavities when their children reached the age of 14.

Nelson stated, “We can’t ignore the environments of these children.  It isn’t enough to tell children to brush and floss; they need more — and particularly from their caregivers.”

The researchers also found that mothers with more education beyond high school, with healthy emotional states, and knowledge about eating right had children with healthier teeth.

If you are concerned about your knowledge and how to protect your family, continue to follow our blogs or schedule an appointment at Periodontal Associates to meet with one of our doctors: Dr. Versman, Dr. Heller, or Dr.Beckman.  You can schedule by calling us at (303) 755-4500, visiting our website at www.periodontalhealth.com, or clicking here.  Our patients come from all over Colorado but we primarily serve the Denver metro area as we are located in Aurora, CO.

Coconuts Conquer Cavities

Coconut Oil Cracks Down on Cavities

 

Along the shorelines, among the most tropical regions, coconuts are being swept up to use for eating, drinking, skin care, and now for cavity prevention.  The Athlone Institute of Technology in Ireland discovered that coconut oil prevents the growth of decay on our pearly whites and could be used as an alternative to chemical additives in dental hygiene products.  Periodontal Associates does not want to see everyone in Denver, CO throwing out their toothpaste quite yet; however, this research does offer some great insight on future oral home care.

The researchers in this study tested this theory on multiple strains of bacteria called streptococcus, which is located in our mouth.  Both the raw coconut and coconut oils were used to determine which forms were more effective at bacteria growth prevention.  The oil, however, was treated with extra enzymes in order to simulate the coconut in the digested state.

The conclusion? The digested coconut, or the oil, was the more powerful of the two forms. The coconut oil inhibited the majority of the strains of the bacteria like streptococcus and candida albicans.  The first, Streptococcus, is a very common tooth decay causing bacteria while candida albicans is yeast that also results in an infection within the mouth called thrush.

 

“Incorporating enzyme-modified coconut oil into dental hygiene products would be an attractive alternative to chemical additives, particularly as it works at relatively low concentrations,” Brady, associate director of the Bioscience Research Institute at the Athlone Institute, said. “Also, with increasing antibiotic resistance, it is important that we turn our attention to new ways to combat microbial infection.”

Drs. Versman, Heller, and Beckman understand how important it is to find effective weapons in fighting bacteria and preventing decay as the number of individuals with decay are increasing daily, both children and adults.  Dental caries affect anywhere between 60% and 90% of children in industrialized countries, which means this is happening in the Denver metro area too.

Brady said he and his colleagues hope to further investigate which other bacteria and yeast the coconut oil might be effective against, as well as, exactly how the oil and other enzyme-modified foods interfere with the processes by which bacteria cause disease.

For now, Dr. Versman, Dr. Heller, and Dr. Beckman suggest routine cleanings, regular brushing and flossing at home, as well as avoiding sugary foods are the best bet to keep tooth decay at bay.  If you have any questions regarding the oral hygiene products you use, please call us at (303) 755-4500, click here for an appointment, or visit our website at www.periodontalhealth.com  for more information.  Periodontal Associates serves patients all over the Denver, CO area, and would be happy to get you started or keep you on the right path for excellent dental health.

 

What is Tooth Sensitivity?

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Have you ever taken a bite of something very cold or a sip of something very hot and recoiled in pain? Do you ever wince with discomfort when brushing or flossing? If you answered yes to any of those questions you may have what’s commonly known as “sensitive teeth”. Around 40 million adults in the United States experience tooth sensitivity, according to the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD).

Why do my teeth feel sensitive?

The inside of your tooth is made up of a material called dentin. This dentin contains microscopic tubules filed with nerve endings. A hard outer layer of enamel protects the crown portion of the tooth, while a layer of cementum protects the root. When this dentin becomes hypersensitive it usually means that it’s lost its protective covering of enamel or cementum, and the nerve endings are left exposed to hot, cold, and acidic foods.

What dental issues cause this?

A bevy of things can cause the enamel and cementum to be worn down, including:

  • Brushing too hard or aggressively, or using a hard bristle toothbrush.
  • Tooth erosion from acidic foods or beverages.
  • Gum Recession
  • And Grinding your teeth

Periodontal disease- an infection of the gums and bones supporting the teeth-may also be to blame. If left untreated, gum tissues can separate from the teeth and form pockets that can house a plethora of bacteria. This can continue until the bone and other supporting structures are destroyed, exposing the root surfaces of the teeth.

How do I treat my sensitive teeth?

Drs. Versman, Heller, and Beckman of Periodontal Associates in the Denver and Aurora, CO area recommend that at the point of Periodontal Disease, you should immediately schedule an appointment with your periodontist to take measures to combat it. If not, you could suffer from many other complications that could arise. However, if your teeth are just experiencing sensitivity, other measures may be:

  • Desensitizing toothpaste
  • A fluoride gel or special desensitizing agents
  • A filling, crown, inlay, or bonding, depending on the cause of sensitivity.

If gum tissue has been lost, Drs. Versman, Heller, and Beckman say they might recommend a surgical gum graft to cover the root and reduce sensitivity. In severe cases of sensitivity that can’t be treated by other means, your periodontist might recommend a root canal to eliminate the issue.