Parents are linked to the number of cavities in their kids’ teeth

Mom’s Emotions Affect Kid’s Dental Health

Periodontal Associates wants everyone to know that gum disease and poor dental health can occur for many reasons.  Dr. Versman, Heller & Beckman suggest you talk to them about your home dental care to make sure you are doing everything you can to prevent gingivitis, cavities, and the need for dental implants.  With that being said, let’s take some time to discuss a new research determining factors in the number of cavities in children.

Researchers at the Case Western Reserve University, US recently released a study that links a mother’s emotional stability and educational background during her kid’s younger years to her child’s dental health at age 14.  The case was structure by interviewing candidates at the ages of three, eight, and finally 14 years old to determine what elements shaped their current oral health and number of cavities.

Suchitra Nelson, lead investigator on the study, had a team examine the teeth of the 224 adolescent participants in a longitudinal study that also followed very low birth weight vs. normal birth weight children. Factors like the number of decayed, filled, or missing permanent teeth and the level of dental plaque were used to determine the quality of oral health.  Case Western Dental School states that these are all direct symptoms of poor hygiene maintenance and Drs. Versman, Heller, and Beckman agree.

Even the mothers, or care givers, were interviewed to reveal their knowledge about preventative treatments like sealants, mouthwash, sugar drinks, access to dental care, and the frequency of visitations to a dentist.  The data revealed that even with access to dental insurance, fluoride treatments, and sealants as young children, it did not always prevent cavities by the age of 14, said Nelson.

Researchers were then able to conclude that the mothers and their overall emotional health, education level, and knowledge when children were at ages 3 and 8 were responsible for increased numbers of cavities when their children reached the age of 14.

Nelson stated, “We can’t ignore the environments of these children.  It isn’t enough to tell children to brush and floss; they need more — and particularly from their caregivers.”

The researchers also found that mothers with more education beyond high school, with healthy emotional states, and knowledge about eating right had children with healthier teeth.

If you are concerned about your knowledge and how to protect your family, continue to follow our blogs or schedule an appointment at Periodontal Associates to meet with one of our doctors: Dr. Versman, Dr. Heller, or Dr.Beckman.  You can schedule by calling us at (303) 755-4500, visiting our website at www.periodontalhealth.com, or clicking here.  Our patients come from all over Colorado but we primarily serve the Denver metro area as we are located in Aurora, CO.

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